DIY, Electronics, Inspiring, LEDs, Lux, Robotics

DIY Vein viewing Device

The problem with veins:

I afraid of getting injections with syringes as it is a very painful experience. Unfortunately, for some people it is even more painful, if their veins are not clearly visible. In that case, usually nurses try to insert the needles into the body by guessing the vein’s position. Sometimes after three to four trails they have to change the spot and start to probe again for invisible veins. It’s particularly a problem for new born babies. Witnessing that needle punches itself is a painful experience.

Simple Solution:

One of the simplest solution to this problem is illuminating the veins by powerful LEDs. This solution relies on the fact that there is a change in colour of the blood, depending on whether it is carrying the oxygen or not. This change can be easily noticeable when veins are illuminated with red LEDs. By exploiting this fact, a company called veinlite made a device that consists of just LEDs (red and orange) and a battery to power them. It has been proved that this device works but it gets patented thus it costs $200 to $300. There are clones of this device, but they too cost ~$100, so these are not particularly affordable to most hospitals.

Open source version:

However, there is a nice guy called Alex, who made a open source version of veinlite and kindly shared the design files with instructions. Recently, I come across a friend who is suffering from this not so easily visible vein’s problem. Therefore, my friend’s hand was swollen and it’s really painful. So I attempted to build this vein viewer with the help of Uday. We just made a one small change to the original design of Alex, by adding a small potentiometer to adjust the brightness of the LEDs. Below are the few pics showing the build process and initial tests. I hope this will be useful to my friend. We didn’t have the exact switch used by Alex, so we adjusted the hole for the switch in the design accordingly. In the future, we will try the rechargeable battery version, if we find the cause. Please see the videos below to know, how it works.

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Top View of our 3D printed VeinViewer

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Bottom View of our 3D printed Vein Viewer

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Vein Viewer during the soldering phase

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First version printed with a wrong colour of a material.

References:

http://www.instructables.com/id/3d-Printed-Medical-Vein-Finder/

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-an-affordable-Vein-Finder-for-use-d/

https://3dprint.com/11056/3d-printed-vein-finders/

 

 

 

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DIY, Electronics, Inspiring, LEDs, photography

Webcam DIY Microscope

I have a fascination with DIY microscopes. I have been making microscopes with ball lens and laser pointer lens etc. When these lenses are coupled with the powerful smartphone cameras, they produce highly magnified images of microscopic objects. However, I come across a very interesting webcam microscope through Guadi labs. Basically, when we reverse the lens of the webcam it acts as a microscope. There are many versions of this microscope in the Gaudi labs website, from which I chose the laser cut version for its simplicity. The parts were cut in 2016 when I was in St Andrews, but now only they are assembled as I kept this project in cold due to other interesting projects. The only improvement, I have done is connecting LEDS of different colours to the webcam board in place if its original white LEDS. That way I am planning to excite many fluorescent proteins.

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Webcam Microscope front view

 

Below you can find the microscopic images of cells (~ 30um in length) taken with this webcam microscope. I also took microscopic images taken from smartphone based microscope with laser pointer lens (details will be in another post, see reference 2). Clearly, webcam gives large magnification but small field of view. On the other hand, laser pointer lens gives smaller magnification and large field of view. So these two DIY low cost systems can be handy for biological applications. In fact, I am making one of this microscope for my colleague to quickly screen drug injected cancer cells to know whether the drug has reached inside the cells or not. I will follow up the progress of that project in a future post. I must tell you that these microscopes are far better than the $15 usb microscope attachments that can be bought online.

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Microscopic image of cancer cells taken with webcam microcope under white LED illumination. The slide was stained with a blue dye.

Cells with orange illumination

Microscopic image of cancer cells taken with webcam microcope under orange LED illumination.

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Microscopic image of cancer cells taken with webcam microcope under red LED illumination.

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Microscopic image of cancer cells taken with smartphone based microscope with laser pointer lens under white LED illumination.

 

References:

http://hackteria.org/wiki/index.php/DIY_microscopy

http://www.instructables.com/id/10-Smartphone-to-digital-microscope-conversion/

Acknowledgments:

Dundee Makerspace

Vamsi

Uday

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ARDUINO, DIY, Electronics, Inspiring, LEDs, photography, Raspberry Pi, Robotics

Experiments with a Light Meter

Why I am interested in Light meters?

When I was working in Scotland, I came across photo dynamic therapy (PDT), which uses light sensitive drugs to kill cancer cells. In the entire UK, there are only two PDT centers (afaik), one of which is in Dundee. By visiting the PDT center in Dundee, I realised that after applying the PDT drugs, doctors ask patients to wait in  sun light for two hours. There is no particular reason for exactly two hours of exposure to sun light. Therefore, it is not possible to know how much light dose has been received by the patients. To address this problem, PDT center at Dundee measured sunlight across the UK and Ireland and suggested that  cheap lux meters can be used to measure the required lux dose. I met with one of the PI and discussed about this in detail.

The problem with cheap light meters:

However, most commercially available cheap lux meters can only give instantaneous measure of light. These are originally developed for photographers to know lighting in their photo and building mangers to know lighting in a room. But PDT application  requires the lux values to be logged, aggregated to know whether the required light dose is reached. I think the only way to realise that is through connecting the lux meters to a microcontroller and stream the values to a smartphone. For that I am going to use a cheap lux meter that I can confidently modify after reading this blog post .

What I did:

I ordered the lux meter with a brand name “Ceto”from the same vendor as suggested in the blog post mentioned above. I identified the pins required to tap to get the lux values out. These are the pins on the amplifier. I soldered wires to these pins to read the voltage. So effectively LUX values are converted to voltage values in this lux meter. For example LUX of 290 is converted as 0.288V. I connected these wires to a multimeter to  see these voltage values.

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Guts of the LUX meter

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Zooming inside

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Red wire is signal

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Black wire is ground

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Hot glue to keep the wires in place

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Made a hole to the case to let the soldered wires come out, so that I can feed them into a multimeter

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More hot glue to fix the wires to the case

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Connected the wires to multimeter and we can see the light values appearing on the Multimeter as voltage values.

In the next step, I will connect the lux meter to a Arduino Uno and Bluetooth so that its possible to record the  aggregated lux values overtime time to determine the light dose for PDT treatment. I will write these details in another post.

P.S: It is just one of my hobby project, not related to my research.

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DIY, Electronics, Inspiring, Robotics

DIY Toy Centrifuge

Why I like a centrifuge?

Whenever I see a motor, I think why shouldn’t it be converted as a centrifuge. I like centrifuge as a scientific instrument, especially after seeing Lab on DVD systems to diagnose diseases. Recently, I came across Manu Prakash’s paperfuge, where whirligig/buzzer toy was modified to get high speed centrifuge without using any electricity. Although, I like the idea, it still takes more than 15 minutes to separate blood to any useful analysis such as malaria detection.  May be there are better ways to improve the existing technology to get a better centrifuge, a cost effective, functional, may be little bit funny one. Latest open source models use brushless motors used in drones to make a centrifuge. I would like to try that idea. However, one has to spend at least spend $30 to make such open source centrifuge. I would like to make a low-cost, fun toy type centrifuge, so that we can teach kids about centrifuges without spending so much.

How I made One:

I took a brushless DC motor from a CPU cooling fan and attached a conical shape of plastic that I cut from a water bottle. It looks good, I am getting decent speeds with a power bank or a computer USB. Look at the videos, where I tried to separate milk, which is not possible with this toy centrifuge. I am sure that we can separate some suspension solutions which I will try soon. So far the plus points of my design are that it doesn’t require any soldering, 3D-printing. I am planning to enclose it in a cardboard box for safety reasons, although current version doesn’t spin at high speeds to make any damage.

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Top part of a water bottel

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Attach the cap to a PC fan

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Glue to attach the cap

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Finally, PC centrifuge is here

Future Plans

I am trying to make a centrifuge that can go up to 16,000 rpm, with a system similar to the above. I already designed a 3D printed holder for tubes. I will update about it soon. Until then enjoy the footage of toy centrifuge video.

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